Longridge: 01772 783 314 | Garstang: 01995 602 129 | Lancaster: 01524 581 306 
 
Longridge: 01772 783 314 
Garstang: 01995 602 129 
Lancaster: 01524 581 306 

Posts tagged “Road Accidents”

MG Legal, Personal Injury Solicitors Lancaster, know that the concept of consenting to an injury seems somewhat odd. Think about it though; Tom Schwarz may not have consented to Fury winning in the fight last weekend, but by climbing through those ropes he’ll have known that he is more than likely to get a punch (or two minutes and fifty-four seconds of punching, to be exact). Surely then there is an argument that knowledge of potential injury means consenting to a personal injury. 
 
So, in relation to other sports, what is the position? Well, it is widely accepted that Horse Riding can be dangerous, and that by participating in the sport, horse riders are accepting a certain risk and therefore giving their consent. But, is there a limit to this consent, and what happens if a personal injury happens because of a negligent act? 
So, you’ve suffered a personal injury. You’ve instructed your local personal injury solicitor in Preston, Lancaster or Garstang, but you and your personal injury solicitor have reached an impasse with the ‘at fault’ party: i.e the MDU in the case of a claim for medical negligence are not settling the matter, or in the case of an accident at work, the employer’s insurers are refusing to see sense, and make sensible offers in settlement of your claim. 
 
In this instance, as any personal injury solicitors in Preston worth their salt will tell you, it’s time to commence legal proceedings. 
When liability is disputed, and the parties to a road traffic accident cannot agree who was at fault, then sometimes, your local personal injury solicitors will advise you to issue legal proceedings against the motorist you believe to be at fault. 
Two cars, one black and one blue, that have collided - the blue one having crashed into the rear of the black car.
In a world where social media filters are used on a daily basis to hide how we really look, and HD TV shows all our wrinkles and defects, many of us don’t feel too comfortable out there in the real world, and we decided to have a nip or a tuck, botox fillers, or even dental braces, to give us the perfect smile. 
In any sport, from boxing to ballet and beyond, there’s always the chance that any one of us, can, and will be injured. 
 
According to a recent survey, the most common sporting injuries are, in no particular order: shin splints, sciatica, pulled hamstring, torn cruciate ligament, concussion, and the good old-fashioned groin pull. And yet it may not always be the person partaking in the sport that gets injured, MG Legal, accident injury solicitors in Lancaster, have also successfully helped those just spectating, receive an award of compensation, too! 
Let’s tell it exactly as it is- representing yourself in court, or when drafting legal documentation, is not a good idea. The rules (Civil Procedure Rules 1998, as we are talking about road traffic accident solicitors, in this instance) are not ‘watered down; for the general public, and there is no special dispensation afforded by the courts to those injured in road traffic accidents who do not have the means to instruct a solicitor dealing in road traffic accidents. And yet, despite the obvious pressures put upon the court system (trust us when we say, it’s already busy, and complicated enough), and the lack of parity for those representing themselves, the Civil Liability Bill is coming to a legal system near you in April 2020. 
We’ve all heard it. Whether it’s down the local, or in some less highbrow magazine.. ‘some bloke from Timbuctoo received a trillion quid for his personal injury settlement, when he lost a fingernail at work’… 
 
But did he, and are these stories all part of the urban myths that have a habit of frequenting the quarters of the less-sober of us…? 
Much to the chagrin of those nasty Defendant lawyers, as of April 2013 Qualified one way costs shifting (QOCS) entered the legal arena, and applied its’ terms to the clients of accident injury solicitors, accident claim solicitors, road traffic accident solicitors, personal injury solicitors Preston, road accident solicitors, solicitors who deal with medical negligence and accident compensation solicitors. As a result of QOCS, clients who have suffered a personal injury, will not, unless specific circumstances apply, be ordered to pay the costs of the successful Defendant. 
MG Legal, your accident injury solicitors can report that, according to a recent review of the insurance industry, the only way cuts can possibly be made by insurers (and passed on to motorists) is if more insurers are introduced into the insurance market. Prolific road traffic accidents solicitors, MG Legal, personal injury solicitors Preston, note that there are no more than nine insurers insuring and underwriting vehicles in the UK, many trading through 2 or more of the names you see on any comparison website. 
Whilst our expert team of accident injury solicitors at MG Legal, accident compensation solicitors, will argue that it’s always been easy to choose Personal Injury solicitors Preston (obviously, choose us!) the Ministry of Justice reforms, due to come into force in April 2020, will affect how personal injury solicitors Preston accept instruction on all potential road traffic accident claims. However, MG Legal, solicitors in Preston, and road traffic accident solicitors, can confirm that vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians, horse riders and cyclists (including motorcycles), may be exempt from the ‘whiplash reforms’ that see the claims threshold for those unfortunate to be involved in road traffic accidents, in cars, to be raised from £1,000.00 to £5,000.00. Personal Injury Solicitors Preston, such as MG Legal Solicitors, are aware of the changes, and, as you would expect from road traffic accident solicitors, solicitors Lancaster, and personal injury solicitors Preston, MG Legal are fully trained, and able to advise clients of the potential changes, including the potential changes in threshold, well ahead of the April 2020 deadline. 

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