Longridge: 01772 783 314 | Garstang: 01995 602 129 | Lancaster: 01524 581 306 
 
Longridge: 01772 783 314 
Garstang: 01995 602 129 
Lancaster: 01524 581 306 

Posts tagged “Family Law”

Family law Solicitors will always stress that it is illegal to monitor a person using online communication tools or spywear. However in the UK, you can legally use covert surveillance cameras in the home to spy on others so long as it is not in an area where there would be an expectation of privacy such as the bathroom/shower/bedroom. 
 
In the case we’re about to look at the use of spy cameras saved a woman’s life. 
Libel and slander are forms of defamation in English law.  
 
Libel is the publication of a defamatory statement in permanent form (for example, in an email, tweet, text, online review, Facebook posting or news article).  
 
Slander is concerned with the spoken word, conduct or other non-permanent expression. 
 
A statement will be defamatory in English law if it is:- 
 
(a) published to a person other than the victim,  
(b) identifies the victim and  
(c) lowers the reputation of the victim in the estimation of right-thinking members of society.  
 
Solicitors who deal with personal injury note that Libel is actionable ‘on the face of it’ which means that so long as you can prove you have been defamed, you will automatically be able to claim at least nominal damages for injury to your feelings and distress caused by the libellous statement. However, due to changes brought about by the Defamation Act 2013, in order to establish a cause of action for defamation, you (as the victim) have to be able to prove on balance of probabilities that the publication has caused or is likely to cause serious harm to your reputation. 
If you have a good relationship with your parents, you might hope that they would leave you an equal share of their estate. However, for some, this isn’t a reality and, for whatever reason, they get left either a higher share or a lower share of their parent’s estate. 
6000 UK residents currently await an organ donation, with 3 people per day dying before they are able to receive their life changing transplant. 
 
Recent studies show that 80% of UK residents support organ donation, however only 38% actually opt into the service. Although, in the event you haven’t made your options clear, the choice is left with your next of kin; this of course can be a difficult subject for them to deal with, and the thought of someone else having their loved ones organs an understandably upsetting prospect. This unfortunately means that they refuse the organ donation. 
 
Thankfully on 15 March 2019, Max and Keira’s Law was passed. 
It’s an odd expression, which you most-likely will have never heard in your day-to-day life, however the Cab Rank Rule applies to barristers, and is a professional obligation to accept instructions from every client, regardless of their personal opinion of the client, or their views of the case that they would be dealing with. According to the Bar Standards Board, it originates from the principles instilled in Cab drivers – no Licensed Hackney Carriage driver can refuse to carry a passenger, save from some limited exceptions. 
Whilst some law firms like to put their trainees in one department for a set period of time and then move them to the next department for a set period of time, here at MG Legal we find it works better to combine seats so that you do not forget the processes and information you have learnt. 
 
My days are often long but they are most certainly never the same! Whilst Conveyancing can sometimes be somewhat transactional, and Family Law more emotional, it is often found that some Conveyancing transactions become frustrating: when there is a chain, affecting your client’s property transaction, and you have no control over Mrs Smith’s property sale, that is three houses down the chain to your client’s purchase, as a property solicitor who liked to be in control of literally everything, then, well, you start to understand the situation!  
 
On the other hand, Family matters are dealt with in an almost business-like manner, in cases where couples have remained quite amicable and both know what they want the outcome to be. Currently, I spend my Mondays and Thursdays within the Family Department, and the remainder of the week with the Conveyancing Department; however, these days will often be swapped if there is a Family matter in Court. 
There are so many different reasons why you may be considering working full-time, whilst studying a law degree. You may be looking to change career, or you may just enjoy work. Whatever your reasons, you will want to go into the part-time-law-degree-full-time-work part of your life as prepared as you possibly can be. 
 
So, our Hope Jordan, who is currently embarking on that very journey, has decided to share a few of the pros and cons of choosing to study that way... 
A large open book, with a red cover, on a grey background.
Finally it’s here! That big old yellow thing is back in the sky, and suddenly the world seems a happier place; so what better way to celebrate than planning your jollies!!  
 
Gathering the kids and jumping on a plane, ready to lay on the beach with an ice cold drink and bathe in the sun. Sounds perfect doesn’t it? But, for some, it isn’t as easy as it sounds - not when there’s an ex-partner involved, and the question of whether they will even let you leave the country with your child in the first place. 
A pool of clear, blue water, with over 10 flamingo floats floating on top.
You might be in need of some legal assistance, or you might be thinking of starting a career in law, or you might just be ‘asking for a friend'; but, before you start, you really do need to know the answer to this question: What is the difference between a barrister, a lawyer, and a solicitor? 
A stack of shelves either side, with files on one side and boxes of documents on the other.
You’ve spent years of your life helping your child grow, helping them along the right path. You’ve bailed them out countless times, picked them up drunk from a party at 3:00am, survived their moody teenage years; put your life on hold to give them the best possible life you could. And now it’s happened, they’ve brought their own little hurricane into the world, and from the moment you saw them, held them for the first time you were in love. Being a grandparent is quite possibly the best job in the world. 
 
You’re their hero, best friend, confidant all rolled into one, you spend your Sundays running around after them, you’re there to babysit at the drop of a hat, whatever they need you’re there to give and you wouldn’t have it any other way. 
 
But what happens when that contact stops? Through no fault of your own? Maybe the parents have split and contact has been stopped, by why should this include your contact with them? In an ideal world it wouldn’t. But unfortunately we don’t live in an ideal world. 

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