Longridge: 01772 783 314 | Garstang: 01995 602 129 | Lancaster: 01524 581 306 
 
Longridge: 01772 783 314 
Garstang: 01995 602 129 
Lancaster: 01524 581 306 

Posts tagged “Civil Partnerships”

MG Legal, local divorce Solicitors, are constantly keeping up to date with various case law and judgements so that they can have a greater understanding of how the Court’s current policies, decisions and views could affect the outcome of your hearing. 
Approximately 1115,000 couples divorce each year in England and Wales. If you need to seek advice in relation to Divorce Law and the Procedure, contact MG Legal, your local divorce Solicitors. Currently divorce law is based on a statute enacted in 1973 and it is argued that this law is hopelessly out of date. Certainly, there have been attempts at reform and more recently there have been requests for launching a campaign for ‘no fault’ divorce. Sir James Munby making his support for a ‘no fault divorce’ clear “The simple fact, to speak plainly, is that….the law which judges have to apply and the procedure which they have to follow are based on hypocrisy and a lack of intellectual honesty”. Read on to discover the current law. 
Not that long ago, our Lancaster Solicitors explained how the Government were now considering expanding the Civil Partnership Act to include any couple who wishes to enter into one (read our Lancaster Solicitors’ blog here). Our Lancaster Solicitors explained that this would benefit co-habiting couples who do not wish to marry, as they could enter into a Civil Partnership and gain the same rights as a married couple, for example, our Lancaster Solicitors explained, they would be entitled to certain benefits on the death of their partner that they would not usually be entitled to. 
At the end of June, our Lancaster solicitors team wrote about a Supreme Court Ruling relating to Civil Partnerships and Marriages, whereby a couple, Steinfeld and Keidan, wanted to enter into a Civil Partnership (read our blog, here). 
 
The final ruling made by the Justices was that the appellant’s rights under article 14 and article 8 of the European Convention of Human Rights was breached by the continuing legality of the Civil Partnership Act 2004 following the introduction of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013. 
 
Until the introduction of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013 (MSSCA), same-sex couples only had one option if they wished to formalise their relationship: they could enter into a civil partnership under the Civil Partnership Act 2004 (CPA). However, different-sex marriage has been well-established in society in England and Wales for hundreds of years.  
 
Many would argue that before MSSCA was introduced, there was a vast inequality in the law for same-sex couples and their rights. However, as anyone can now enter into a Marriage, it was argued that everyone's rights had reached an equilibrium.  
 
However, for one couple, this was not the case. 
 

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