Longridge: 01772 783 314 | Garstang: 01995 602 129 | Lancaster: 01524 581 306 
 
Longridge: 01772 783 314 
Garstang: 01995 602 129 
Lancaster: 01524 581 306 

Posts from June 2018

Until the introduction of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013 (MSSCA), same-sex couples only had one option if they wished to formalise their relationship: they could enter into a civil partnership under the Civil Partnership Act 2004 (CPA). However, different-sex marriage has been well-established in society in England and Wales for hundreds of years.  
 
Many would argue that before MSSCA was introduced, there was a vast inequality in the law for same-sex couples and their rights. However, as anyone can now enter into a Marriage, it was argued that everyone's rights had reached an equilibrium.  
 
However, for one couple, this was not the case. 
 
Now-a-days, every moment of our lives is consumed with entering into a contract and usually, by proxy, agreeing to the Terms and Conditions. If you're signing up for a new 'phone contract, or you're simply purchasing a loaf of bread, a contract is being formed. We know - this seems crazy - but, believe it or not, the terms of buying and selling items in shops (and some other places), for example, are covered by the Consumer Rights Act 2015, which covers both the sellers and the buyer alike. 
 
However, for other agreements, a written contract is required which has to be signed by both parties to be legally binding. The most obvious one is when you sell or purchase a house (if you're selling or buying, contact MG Legal's expert team today for first-class advice). Both parties have to sign a contract which, once exchanged (see our blog on 'The Conveyancing Process'), means that both parties are legally bound to see the contract through. And, if one party fails to uphold their end of the contract, there are usually sanctions in place. 
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